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WORKSHOP: JAPANESE GARDEN BRACELET (instructional fee plus kit and instructions)

$115.00

WORKSHOP: JAPANESE GARDEN BRACELET (instructional fee plus kit and instructions)

$115.00
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WORKSHOP: JAPAN GARDEN BRACELET
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Japanese Garden Bracelet Workshop @Be Dazzled Beads

Japanese Garden Bracelet Workshop

Instructor: Warren Feld

 




Experience the romance of leisurely meandering over the bridge, around the pond, and through the fragrant flower and tea gardens!

WORKSHOP:
Saturday, April 28th, 2016
10am-4pm
Limited to 12 students

REGISTRATION DEADLINE:
April 20th, 2016


Be Dazzled Beads
718 Thompson Lane, Ste 123, Nashville, TN 37204
$45.00 instructional fee
$70.00 kit and instructions
(2 palette choices --

Fragrance Garden,
or
Tea Garden)


Intermediate Level
--Bead Weaving Sequence
--Lesson: Fringe, Square Stitch, Ladder Stitch
--Bracelet




 

INSPIRATION:
The JAPANESE GARDEN BRACELET PROJECT

Japanese Garden Bracelet

 

The Japanese Garden Bracelet is a fun project that students love. It is for students who have some familiarity with bead weaving.

I chose colors which mirrored the flower colors in pictures of Japanese gardens. I arranged them in a pleasing way, but no more involved strategy beyond that.

Japanese gardens are designed to express their cultural values and philosophies. The gardens express the fragility of existence as well as time’s unstoppable advance. In this garden landscape we see the red moon bridge over a glistening pond of water surrounded by flowering shrubs, trees and plants.

In a fragrance garden, commonly used Japanese garden plants that unfurl flowers include peony, chrysanthemum and, near water features, Japanese water iris. Flowering shrubs include azalea, camellia and hydrangea, all of which provide strong winter interest.

Traditional Japanese tea gardens were divided into two distinct areas separated by a simple barrier, like a bamboo gate or a moss-covered rock wall, with an opening to walk through. The first part of the garden was meant to entice--to create a mood of anticipation for the coming ceremony. The roji might be set with stepping stones or raised wooden planks flanked on either side by a garden pool filled with koi. The outer garden would generally be filled with an ornamental tree, a few shrubs and plants, and a water element such as a waterfall, small garden pond or pool.

We feel that each plant, walkway, stone and other related elements have been deliberately placed, some shaped and others allowed to grow at will. Japanese gardens are designed to express their cultural values and philosophies. The gardens express the fragility of existence as well as time’s unstoppable advance. I believe the Japanese Garden Bracelets captures all this.
This project is also a good example of how you can use a natural setting for inspiration. This setting influences color choice, color positioning, as well as shape and its placement. This is the image that inspired this piece.

kitjapFragrance-inspiration.jpg kitjapTea-inspiration.jpg
Flower Garden Tea Garden

 


ABOUT THE JAPANESE GARDEN BRACELET PROJECT

     

 

For the project we are doing here, I wanted to make a woman's bracelet, about 7" (about 175mm long) (including the clasp) long and about 3/4" (20mm) wide, and which has a comfortable fit on the wrist, but not overly loose. This is a casual piece. The Japanese Garden Bracelet consists of a square stitch base and fringe off the base. When you add the fringe and border, it has the effect of arching, thus narrowing the width of, the base. And when you add the edging, it has the effect of widening the base, and canceling out any narrowing effect that results from adding the fringe and border.

I had been experimenting with various strategies for bead weaving an “arch” shape (parabolic arch) which can keep its physical shape while the bracelet is worn. Not an easy task. It has required hours and hours of trial and error. The final choices here were influenced by the architecture of Antonio Gaudi, building a column in segments, and then forcing it into a tight arch configuration.

In this project, the foundation base serves a very integrative function with it’s embellishment. The foundation base has areas with dichroic glass to mirror reflective ponds. The points on the foundation base where the bridges are anchored to the piece emphasize a built-in, strong support system.

It is important, I believe, for a contemporary piece of jewelry to have a sense of dimensionality, movement, and a strong use of color. In contemporary pieces, we also want some sense of the violation of straight lines and flat planes.

The instructions detail the choice options in selecting colors, selecting shapes and selecting thread. Not every color will work. Not every shape will work. Not every strategy for combining colors/shapes will work. Not every thread will work. I do a lot of "think-alouds" when writing instructions, so that you can follow my thinking in making the final choices among all these options.

 


WHAT YOU WILL LEARN...

     


In the JAPANESE GARDEN BRACELET project, you will learn how to create a design which integrates foundation base and top fringe embellishment. You will also learn how to create a parabolic arch shape which will maintain its shape and structure while the bracelet is worn.

The instructions help you...
...visualize each stitch pattern,
...lead you through a fun project, and
...offer many design possibilities for the bead weaving artist.

LearnToBead Goals: How to...

- Select appropriate beads and thread for creating fringe

- Relate color choices to an image taken from nature

- Create a square stitch base

- Integrate pattern of base with pattern for top embellishment

- Create fringe

- Using the ladder stitch, design a parabolic arch to function as a bridge

- Embellish edges along your square stitch base using a book binding stitch

- Add a button clasp with loop




My kit projects are part of our overall education program at Be Dazzled Beads in Nashville. These kits are developed within what is called The Design Perspective.

The Design Perspective focuses on how the jewelry designer and bead artist make choices about...
-what to do, and not do
-what to include, and not include
-how to balance off conflicting demands between beauty and functionality.

 

 

 


 

 

 

PALETTES:
JAPANESE GARDEN BRACELET PROJECT


Palettes: Available in 2 palettes


Palette #1: Fragrance Garden



Palette #2: Tea Garden


 

About Warren Feld


warrenFeld1.jpg

"Jewelry Design Is A Life Lived With Wearable Art" -- Warren Feld



For Warren Feld, Jewelry Designer, beading and jewelry making endeavors have been wonderful adventures. These adventures, over the past 31 years, have taken Warren from the basics of bead stringing and bead weaving, to wire working and silver smithing, and onward to more complex jewelry designs which build on the strengths of a full range of technical skills and experiences.

He, along with his partner Jayden Alfre Jones, opened a small bead shop in downtown Nashville, Tennessee, about 30 years ago, and called it Land of Odds. Over time, Land of Odds evolved from a bricks and mortar store into a successful internet business – www.landofodds.com . In the late 1990s, Jayden and Warren opened up another bricks and mortar bead store – Be Dazzled Beads – in a trendy neighborhood of Nashville called Berry Hill. Together both businesses supply beaders and jewelry artists with all the supplies and parts they need to make beautiful pieces of wearable art.

Warren leads a group of instructors at Be Dazzled Beads. He teaches many of the bead-stringing, jewelry design as well as business-oriented courses in the curriculum. He works with people just getting started with beading and jewelry making, as well as with the program’s advanced bead study groups.

His pieces have appeared in beading and jewelry magazines and books. One of his pieces is in the Swarovski museum in Innsbruck, Austria.


 

 

 

REGISTRATION

You may register in person at Be Dazzled Beads, by phone (615) 292-0610, or here online.
When registering online, select the WILL PICK UP AT BE DAZZLED shipping option.

 

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